Avery Candlewood Festival

 

Last updated 4/11/2019 at 10:04am

Michael Sadler

Most art is appreciated by the eye of the beholder, yet the Candlewood Arts Festival, held March 29 – 31, also had public participation at its core.

Sponsored by the Under the Sun Foundation, director Halina Avery and Festival Curator Kris Kuramitsu sought to "celebrate the connections between art, community, and our shared environment in the dramatic landscape of Borrego Springs."

The Candlewood Arts Festival, named for the fragrant ocotillo that dots the landscape around Borrego Springs, brought five new art projects to the unique desert community. Taking cues from the generous spirit of the Sky Art sculptures in Galleta Meadows, the festival, meant for audiences of all ages, was aimed to inspire new ways of seeing and understanding the unique landscape and community of Borrego Springs, for locals and visitors alike.

This is the first project of Under The Sun Foundation, a non-profit organization inspired by the work of Dennis Avery, the late landowner of Galleta Meadows in Borrego Springs, and founded by three of his children – Halina, Chris, and Theo Avery.


Dennis Avery commissioned artist Ricardo Breceda to produce 130 large scale, free-standing, metal sculptures and referred to them as Sky Art. Spread over 1,500+ acres of undeveloped desert land, these larger than life creations welcome the public to discover and enjoy art outdoors, surrounded by the rich and diverse desert of Borrego Springs. The Under the Sun Foundation seeks to breathe new life and meaning into the existing sculptures.

Using Dennis Avery's work and Borrego Springs as a point of inspiration, "We at the Under the Sun Foundation are excited to see where our evolution might take us," stated the Under the Sun Foundation website. "We use Dennis Avery's work and Borrego Springs as a point of inspiration, and expect to add new geographies, artistic endeavors, and ways to engage with our environment over the coming years."

Out at Galleta Meadows, there were four artistic "installations" for public viewing: An 11-panel ocotillo-themed installation by Pearl Hsiung, where our school kids provided the colorful artwork in the "combs" of the wood panels that later will be part of her larger Holocene Screen.

All things considered, it was a very successful event, judging by the participation of lots of happy people, both local and visitors, and we'll look forward to the second Candlewood Arts Festival. Like our Film Fest and those delicious Seley Reds, it will ripen with age.


Under the Sun expects to add new geographies, artistic endeavors, and ways to engage with our environment and one another over the coming years.

Full article in the April 4 issue of the Borrego Sun.

 
 

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